Behind the Colour: Suffield Green

Written on 28th October 2021

Walls: Suffield Green No.77 and Clunch No.2009; Liberty Interiors Fabric: Wiltshire Blossom, Lichen 

 

THE ESSENTIALS 

Name and number: Suffield Green No.77

Primer & Undercoat: Mid Tones

Complementary White: Lime White

ABOUT SUFFIELD GREEN

Suffield Green is a colour of many charms, but its timelessness surely takes the top spot. It’s an homage to Britain’s rekindled love affair, in the early 20th century, with all things Georgian, and was inspired by a colour commonly used by architects throughout the reigns of all four Georges.

Neo-Georgian became the dominant architectural style for public buildings in Britain from around 1920 and would continue to be so for decades. Its influence spread to interior palettes of the time, too, with this particular shade of green being a common sight on pre-war colour cards.

Today, Suffield Green doesn’t need to be part of a retro scheme to really shine. That said, it can’t help looking perfectly at home next to Liberty’s vintage-inspired Wiltshire Blossom print in the colourway Lichen, a combination jointly hand-picked by our experts and Liberty’s.

Walls: Suffield Green No.77 and Clunch No.2009; Sofa cushions: Liberty Wiltshire Blossom in Lichen

Walls: Suffield Green No.77 and Clunch No.2009; Fabric: Liberty Wiltshire Blossom in Lichen

“Choosing a wall colour that mirrors the hints of green in Wiltshire Blossom, rather than the more forthcoming colours of its flowers, is a less obvious approach to building a scheme,” says our colour curator, Joa Studholme, “but it’s one that works beautifully!” 

HOW TO USE SUFFIELD GREEN 

For an easy way to introduce Suffield Green to your home, Joa suggests a soothing palette of Traditional Neutrals. The neutrals in this group share a subtle green undertone that means they go effortlessly with Suffield Green – try the lighter Slipper Satin on the ceiling and trim alongside Suffield Green walls, with Old White as a complementary accent on skirting boards, or perhaps a piece of furniture.

For a bolder take, try the always-popular combination of pink and green. Earthy Dead Salmon has a similar intensity to Suffield Green, sharing its slightly greyed, ‘knocked-back’ look, which allows them to sit together beautifully. Try this palette in a contemporary kitchen-diner, with Dead Salmon walls, Suffield Green cabinets, and a Studio Green island or dresser.

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